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New Commercial Campaign Urges You to Conserve Water Even More

Officials from the Metropolitan Water District want you to take the drought seriously.

Courtesy the Metropolitan Water District.
Courtesy the Metropolitan Water District.

Southern California's water-management agency began running commercials on television and radio today, urging residents to save water in the face of a prolonged drought.

"We're building a broad outreach campaign that reinforces to Southern Californians just how serious the drought is," Metropolitan Water District of Southern California General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger said.

"Southland consumers and businesses have certainly made significant improvements in using water more efficiently over the past 20 years, for which we thank them," he said. "This drought, however, compels all of us to take water conservation to the next level by incorporating permanent changes to ensure we use water, particularly outdoors, where up to 70 percent of water is used."

The MWD's "Don't Waste Another Minute Wasting Water" campaign features 30-second television and 60-second radio spots, along with online and mobile ads. The television ads will run on Los Angeles- and San Diego-area stations through Sept. 28. The radio ads will be couple with traffic-report sponsorships English, Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese and Korean stations.

The ads are part of $5.5 million effort approved by the MWD board in March for a public-awareness campaign aimed at encouraging conservation and spreading awareness of the drought.

--City News Service


WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THE AD? WILL IT CHANGE YOUR HABITS? TELL US IN THE COMMENTS: 


Marshall Thompson July 08, 2014 at 11:26 AM
Green lawns are stupid in a coastal desert. We don't live in a rain forest or New England, people.
george gregory July 08, 2014 at 11:47 AM
they don't sell as much water so they charge more for what they sell ///// wages have surpassed infrastructure so mwv employees can afford their water bill even in times of shortage// reminds me of Enron and the California energy rip off
Donna Fleming July 08, 2014 at 12:35 PM
If they truly want to make a difference in water usage they would target the city and state governments who continue to approve new high density residential building. Every time they approve another new development project they are adding to the drain on water. And, fracking needs to stop. Forcing millions of gallons of water and chemicals under pressure into wells in California is a dangerous travesty. Not only does the process of fracking use water, it contaminates the ground water. Yes there is a drought but it is our city and state government who can make a difference, but they continue to build new housing and frack wells to encourage oil production. It is all about money.
Joker Joe July 08, 2014 at 01:18 PM
City of Huntington Beach is letting a contractor put in a 276 unit complex on Beach and Ellis Ave. Three story underground parking for over 400 cars. Also included are commercial stalls. Where is the water coming from? Did the dumb bells talk to God and he said o.k. I will supply you with rain water? Next. The city is digging up concrete sidewalks to plant trees. Trees need to be watered twice a week. The truck delivers water for them. But their is a water shortage???? lol lol The idiots have no idea how to run a city. Wait until they try to get re-elected! I could care less about conserving.
Homer July 08, 2014 at 01:36 PM
Irvine, Lake Forest, San Juan... all building homes by the tens of thousands. Where's the water? -- San Diego County over built for their water and now purchase water from the farm leases in the Imperial Valley. It's still not enough water, and never will be enough water to meet the demand.

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